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Month: March 2014

Moderators and Mediators: When vs. Why

By Victoria Briones, Ph.D. Statistics Consultant, HelpWithStatistics.com | DissertationAdvisors.com | DissertationWriting.com Novice researchers often think the terms moderator and mediator are interchangeable. But these are two different concepts that require different statistical procedures (Baron & Kenny, 1986). The best way to remember the major distinction between these two terms is that a moderator tells you …

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Killing Me (Softly) with Your Words

Jo-Ann Langtree | Book Editing Associates A radical, true, and wholly repulsive idea occurred to me the other day.  I was editing a book about how the Divine Feminine must supplant the authoritarian masculine – a common theme in the New Age books that are my specialty – when it struck me that I was …

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Fiction Classification, Part 1: Literary or Genre?

by Marie Valentine, Book Editor and Proofreader Fiction is a narrative told in prose form about events not true to life. Many books include disclaimers that the work is made up solely by the author’s imagination, and any similarities the tale bears to real events are coincidences. Forms of fiction range in style, length, and …

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Writing the Query Letter

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First Contact With Acquisitions Editors Copyright 1998-present L Lotman, Book Editing Associates Book-Editing.com Whether you work on magazine articles, nonfiction, or novels, you must be able to write query letters to literary agents or acquisitions editors that generate excitement and result in an invitation to submit your work. “Work as hard on your query letter …

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For First-Time Authors —

Rachel Stone Book Editing Associates It is definitely scary thinking of publishing for the first time, sharing your writing with someone else—in this case—your unseen audience somewhere “out there,” can be downright paralyzing. And you’re nervous that your grammar might not be quite right, or maybe your book isn’t organized correctly, or, maybe you have …

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The Query-Query Strategy

By Mark Orrin Senior Editor/Authors’ Mentor Book Editing Associates Ever feel you can’t approach certain agents or publishing house editors because they say they’ll only look at solicited projects? Here’s a strategy I call Query-Query, that more than a few writers I’ve mentored (and I myself) have used to get past such apparently insurmountable roadblocks to …

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Manuscript Evaluation | Part 6: Resolution, Audience Appeal, Moving Forward

Analysis by Mark Orrin Plot Movement/Resolution Because you do so much non-signaled “jumping around” from head to head, because your dialogue mechanics don’t function well, because you don’t have a well-enough-focused main character, because you over-describe settings and places, because of the arcane technical nature of many passages, because, again, one scientist’s findings alone wouldn’t …

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Book Review: The Horse, the Wheel and Language

The Horse, the Wheel and Language: How Bronze-Age Riders from the Eurasian Steppes Shaped the Modern World, by David W. Anthony James N. Powell, Book Editor Book Editing Associates Editing-Writing.com   One of the things I did in grad school was to become a Proto-Indo-European otaku, a long, lonely voyage into the dark and uncharted …

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Every Spelling Error in This Blog Has Been Seen In Real Life

Rosanne Cornbrooks Catalano, Washington and Lee University alumnus Professional Book Editor Book Editing Associates ~ Editing-Writing.com ~ ChildrensBookEditors.com I’ve always liked W&L’s practice of expecting all students, not just English majors, to write well. In our connected age, when internal memos can go viral for odd reasons and whatever goes on the Internet, stays on …

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Thesis or Dissertation Writing: How Many Pages or Words?

By Jeff Karon, academic editor Editing-Writing.com Book-Editing.com One of the often unspoken worries of dissertation and thesis writers is length: what is the minimum number of pages or words that the writer should produce? The very question may seem too crude for writers to ask their directors or committees—indeed, there are faculty members who may …

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The Ten “I’s” of Antagonism

By David A. Cathcart As I’ve observed the actions of antagonists in movies, novels and the real world, I’ve noticed a progressive pattern of tactics they use against anyone who dares to thwart their plans. I call it the “Ten I’s of Antagonism.” Why ten? Because it’s a nice,  round number. Why “I’s”? Because nothing …

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The LY Adverb As Story Killer

Theodora Bryant They are “tell” words, they are lazy words, they are smudge words, not action words, and your readers are going to drown in the goo of them, not get all on the edge of their seats waiting for the next ly adverb that describes your action. Some of the worst (which can be discarded …

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Dialogue Tips: Don’t Aver It, Opine It, or Intone It; Just Say It!

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by Carly Cantor Novelists work hard to create edgy or witty or snappy or simply realistic-sounding dialogue. But even when that goal is achieved, awkward mechanics can make these passages sound stilted and amateurish. Many writers seem to feel that continually writing said after a character has spoken is boring and monotonous. To remedy this …

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Commonly Mistaken Words

By Nancy Rosenbaum Professional Editor Editing-Writing.com Book-Editing.com Words that sound alike but mean different things (homonyms) or are spelled similarly but mean different things (homophones) are among the most common of mistakes. Consider these homonyms and homophones. If you have difficulty remembering which one is which, trust an editor on this site to know the difference …

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How To Leap Over The Slush Pile, Part 2

How To Leap Over The Slush Pile To Non-Subsidy Print, Part 2 Read Part 1 here. Copyright 1994, 1996, 2000, 2010 by Mark Orrin, M.A. Author/Co-Author of 17 Non-Self-Published Books IF THE EDITOR AGREES TO READ YOUR MANUSCRIPT AND PROPOSAL, CONGRATULATIONS! YOU’VE LEAPED THE SLUSH PILE! NOTE: Leaping the slush pile DOESN’T GUARANTEE your book …

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Authors … How To Leap Over The Slush Pile to Non-Subsidy Print, Part 1

by Mark Orrin, M.A. Author/Co-Author of 17 Non-Self-Published Books FACT: Every book that achieves publication in America has to fight its way past some 100 other submitted works that will never be published. (Will yours be a “never?”) Of books actually published, less than 5% ever earn a dime for their publishers or a penny …

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