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5 Reasons (Plus One Bonus Reason) Why Every First-time Author Should Self-publish

David Cathcart

by David A. Cathcart, editor What first-time author doesn’t dream of landing a lucrative book deal with a big publisher, complete with a six-figure advance, a book tour, media spots, the works? As lovely as this sounds, the sad reality is, these days such deals are about as rare as global warming skeptics at a …

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7 Mistakes Amateur Writers Make That Reveal to Agents They Are Not “Serious” Writers

book authors and editors

by Carly Cantor Agents are inundated with submissions. Technology has made it easy for people to write and then submit what they’ve written to agents (or directly to publishing houses), hopeful their work will be recognized as a gem. But there’s an enormous mismatch between the number of people who think they have a publishable …

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Recommended Books

Authors who partner with our editors write in all genres and styles. Below are a handful of titles our editors have worked on: reconsidering and rewriting, reimagining and restructuring, committed to the revision of these books until they were ready for publication. Madness Overrated by Esra Kus Edited by Sarah Anderson Published: January 2017, Createspace …

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Your Life Wisdom is My Passion

by Sarah Anderson, editor I specialize in editing books on Spirituality and New Age topics, many of which are memoir or autobiographies focused on the journey of spiritual growth and/or in which material was inspired by the voice of the “higher self.” Some of these are in a new genre often called “awakening,” in which the …

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Story Structure: Putting Our Pants On One Leg at a Time, Like Everybody Else

paranormal-romance-book-editor

by Kelly Lynne, editor What do stories have in common with a pair of pants? Structure! To be recognizable as a story, a narrative must obey a few conventions, but like pants, infinite variety can be layered upon that. The concept of story structure is anathema to some writers, a restriction to be balked at, but …

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The 3 Rules of Writing Novels

by Caroline Hiley, editor These are the primary facts of life about writing and publishing a novel: It’s your story, your voice, your work. Writing is a craft as well as an art. Once your book leaves your hands, it becomes a product. Remember these facts, and you will have little trouble in your journey …

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Make it Plain

by Karin Graham, editor No one wants to read anything that looks like the terms of use for the average computer software. Why do we insist on writing like that? For example, here is an excerpt of the Terms of Use for the Waze app.* All words in this entire blog entry that are in boldface …

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How Do You Edit a Manuscript You Dislike?

by Kelly Lynne, editor Sometimes the first look at an unpublished manuscript forms a negative opinion, especially if we editors only get to see a sample of 25 pages before deciding to work with an author. If our pocketbook gives us little choice about taking on a project, we are forced to look deeper into …

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What Novelists Can Learn from Singers

by Caroline Hiley, editor Like many Americans, I watch the popular TV show The Voice, and have done so since it debuted. Originally I tuned in because I enjoy talent competitions and music, and wished to be entertained; but soon, and to my surprise, I saw an underlayer to the show forming a model that …

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Another Thought on Writers Conferences

By Editor John David Kudrick In my most recent post, I touched on why authors should attend a writers conference, focusing on two main reasons: First, it’s a great place to pitch your book to an agent or editor. And, second, it’s a place to be around other people who take writing seriously, allowing you …

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Thoughts on Writers Conferences

By Editor John David Kudrick One question I encounter somewhat regularly from authors is: “Should I attend a writers conference?” Before I actually attended a writers conference myself, I would have likely responded with questions about what the author hoped to accomplish by attending, if it would be a financial burden for them, etc. Now, …

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Where to Start with Editing?

by Amy Bennet, editor As a writer, I get it. You’ve worked hard on your book. You just want to know if it’s good, and if there are things you can do to make it better. You have options when it comes to editing. Developmental editing, also called content editing or substantive editing, is a …

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Affordable Writers’ Conferences

Writing Conferences through 2017 by Editing-Writing.com Affordability is in the eye of the beholder, but these are less expensive than other conferences. April: North Carolina Writers Conference – 4/22 early registration ends 4/16 $150 scholarships: resume and letter of interest to ed@ncwriters.org by 4/7 Spring Big Apple 2017 – 4/22 $185, NYC Travel and Words – 4/23-25 Experienced track: $175, …

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How to Make a Book Editor Smile

David Alan Editing-Writing.com Book-Editing.com For 20 years I worked as an editor for Publications International managing book projects and copy editing manuscripts. Whenever a writer sent me a document for the first time, I opened it with conflicting emotions. Part of me was excited, as if I were opening a present on Christmas morning; yet …

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The Care and Cultivation of the Writer-Editor Relationship

Book Editing Associates Book-Editing.com Editing-Writing.com ChildrensBookEditors.com Freelance Network Coordinator: Lynda Lotman Editorial contributors: Rachel Stone, Marlo Garner, Kelly Lynne Be honest—about everything: your comfort level regarding editorial input, your budget, and your deadline date. Your preferred editors may turn down your submission if your budget and deadline aren’t realistic. If you’re flexible, say so in your submission. …

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How to Teach an Old Genre New Tricks

By Hannah Earthman Remember all those pulse-pounding dystopias and dramas with animal characters you read as a tween? No? Yeah, me neither. For ’80s and ’90s kids, growing out of Little Golden Books and “early readers” into lengthy chapter books also basically meant growing out of stories in which animals were the main characters. It’s …

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The Logic of Literature

Alan Jeffries

by Alan Jeffries, Developmental Editor – Science Fiction, Fantasy, Horror, Young Adult Adventure I am a developmental editor specializing in genre fiction, and have been for most of my life in publishing (which began as a journalist and small press editor/publisher back in the early Eighties). Aside from a work’s core concept (this key bit of …

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Why Should I Hire a Consultant to Help with My Dissertation Proposal?

(Isn’t that what my dissertation chair and committee are for?) by Richard Pollard, Ph.D. I’ve worked with a lot of doctoral students over the years and, until recently, I didn’t know anyone who had hired a dissertation consultant. But, in retrospect, many of the candidates who never finished their doctorates, or who took way too …

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Use Dialogue to Show Not Tell

by Kelly Lynne Romance Novel Editor | Book Editing Associates “I am talking to you,” he said. Then he continued, “Now I’m talking some more.” She replied, “I am responding to what you said.” “We’re the only two people present in this scene,” he communicated. “Maybe the readers will get confused about who is speaking,” she …

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Serious About Writing? Then You’d Betta’ Get A Beta Reader

editorial-services

By David A. Cathcart You’ve just completed your first novel. You’re convinced it’s the next great American classic, your Catcher in the Rye, the book that is so big and important you’ll never have to write another, content to spend the rest of your days as an eccentric recluse instead. Better yet, you’re certain that …

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Using Your Senses to Write Well

How to incorporate the five senses into your writing  by Marie Valentine, Editor See, taste, touch, smell, hear. I wrote these words on a sticky note and put it on my writing desk until I absorbed them. The five senses are how we perceive the world, and through them writers translate experience to a reader. Without the senses, …

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Should You Consider a Manuscript Critique?

by Floyd Largent Content Editor | Books | Short Stories If you’ve recently completed a book-length manuscript, it’s best to run it past another pair of eyes before you send it out into the world. As the author, you may be too close to the project to see its potential flaws, from minor continuity errors …

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How Do Authors Find Time to Write?

by Editor John David Kudrick I enjoy working with authors no matter how they approach the task of writing, whether it’s with bubbly joy and passion or steely grit and determination—or, more typically, a combination of both. In any case, these authors have done something that many other wishful writers have only talked and/or daydreamed …

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NYC-Publisher Editing for the Self-Published Writer

by Hannah Earthman, editor Thanks to the ability to sell your book on Amazon’s virtual bookshelves, you can—with a professionally designed cover, viable reviews, and a crafty name for your indie publishing outfit—make your work appear the equal of titles from Random House and HarperCollins. With services such as Kindle Unlimited bringing self-published works increasingly …

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Keepin’ It Real with Dialogue

by Editor John David Kudrick It will probably come as no surprise that editors enjoy the written word, which means that most of us wordsmiths not only work with words as a profession, but we also have our noses in books each day for the pure joy of reading. To wit, just the other night, …

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Editing for Sport: Q&A with John Ethier, Author

John Ethier’s new novel, a basketball thriller titled The Little Red Boat, was edited by Marie Valentine of Book Editing Associates. Here, she gets more information on his process.   Tell us about your book. The Little Red Boat is the story of two friends, Jamie and Angel, who come from a small town in northern …

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How to Write a Paper in APA Format: Avoiding the Most Common Errors

by David Henderson The American Psychological Association (APA) style guide, which is the standard formatting and citation system for the social sciences (not just psychology), can seem as long, intricate, and daunting as the U.S. tax code. Indeed, it takes some time and effort to master it (which is why hiring an editor for assistance is …

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Why Should You Do a Mixed Methods Research Project?

by Rick Oaks I teach a variety of research courses to my doctoral students: a qualitative course that emphasizes interviewing, a statistics course that emphasizes SPSS, and a mixed methods course that emphasizes how to complete your dissertation before you are ready to retire. For some time now I have been advising my students to …

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How to Approach an Editorial Letter

by Andrea Robb As fun and rewarding as the writing process can be, there’s no denying that it’s hard work. Reaching the last word of a manuscript often feels akin to finishing a marathon . . . only unlike running a race, completing the first draft of a manuscript is often just the beginning. In …

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How Long Does It Take To Write A Dissertation?

by Rick Oaks Many doctoral students are surprised at how long it takes to write a dissertation. There is a good reason for this: most doctoral programs tell their incoming students that they can write a dissertation in a year. In my experience, this is not true. I have been working with graduate students for …

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